High School Fellowship: Year Eight

hs-fellows-2017

The 2016-2017 Fellowship includes:

Lisa Ho: Senior, The Stony Brook School

Paige Bzdyk– Senior, Babylon High School

Sarah Baylis– Senior, South Side High School

Miranda Raiford– Senior, Floral Park Memorial High School

Michael Higgins– Senior, Sachem High School East

Sustainable Long Island’s High School Fellowship Program recently began its eighth year of engaging other young adults in planning for the future. The focus of this year’s High School Fellowship is food equity, green infrastructure, as well as other sustainable development issues.

Over the next several months, the fellows will enjoy a variety of hands-on training, innovative projects, field trips, and guest speaker presentations where they will learn about a variety of sustainability issues and planning methods.

High School Fellowship: Year Seven

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 The seventh year High School Fellows included:

  • Michaela Fehn (Senior, East Islip High School)
  • Ana Bozor (Senior, Westbury High School)
  • Sarah Saul (Freshman, Jericho High School)

Sustainable Long Island’s 7thAnnual High School Fellowship employed high school students from Long Island communities to work closely with staff on economic development, environmental health, and social equity projects with the organization. Funded by the Winston Foundation, the 2015-2016 program engaged students in discussions and activities focused on recycling, solar energy, green infrastructure, energy conservation, community agriculture, food equity, sustainable development, water quality, climate change, disaster preparedness, and more! Fellows developed creative, fun outreach methods targeted at young adults, and learned about local and regional food systems while helping with Sustainable Long Island’s youth-run farmers’ markets. Students including Michaela Fehn of East Islip High School, Ana Bozor of Westbury High School, and Sarah Saul of Jericho High School, received a stipend for their work.

The 2016 program included:

Participating in Community Planning and Sustainability Orientation:

  • Learning about planning methods, roles of stakeholders
  • Developing knowledge of local/regional environmental concerns, with a focus on climate change

Providing assistance at community youth-led farmers’ markets:

  • Outreach to youth, increasing awareness of food equity issues on Long Island
  • Participating in training to develop skills in small business management
  • Demonstrating knowledge of produce to community consumers, along with benefits of eating local, nutritious food and supporting regional farmers and the local economy

Developing and further expanding the Mentorship Initiative:

  • Outreach to youth and local/regional high schools
  • Developing and distributing educational materials
  • Reporting on findings

High School Fellowship: Year Six

HS Fellows 14-15

The sixth year High School Fellows included:

Remington Limfrom Syosset; attends Syosset High School (Senior)

Jocelyn Godoy from Bay Shore; attends Bay Shore High School (Senior)

Gabriella Marino – from East Islip; attends East Islip High School (Senior)

Miracle Bennettfrom Westbury; attends Westbury High School (Junior)

Sustainable Long Island’s High School Fellowship Program concluded its sixth year of engaging other young adults in planning for the future. The focus of the sixth High School Fellowship was resource management, water quality, energy conservation, and “greener living”, as well as additional sustainable development issues. Over the summer of 2015 Fellows enjoyed a variety of field trips and guest speaker presentations that introduced them to a variety of sustainability topics.

The Fellows began their “green” field trip series with a visit to Level Solar, which provided a firsthand look into the solar power industry. The students traveled to the facility, located in Ronkonkoma, where they met with market analyst, Zack Grey, who gave a PowerPoint presentation on solar power and facilitated a discussion about the benefits of solar power versus the use of fossil fuels, coal, and natural gas and the resulting carbon emissions that contribute to climate change. He then led them on an hour-long tour of the facility and shared some career advice and spoke about his role and involvement at the company.

On another trip, the fellows then visited Covanta, Long Island’s largest Energy-from-Waste facility, which provides environmentally safe municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal. The students were led on a tour by facility staff, who described how the facility processes 2,505 tons of municipal solid waste per-day, how the power generated is then sold to the Public Service Electric and Gas Company (PSEG), providing electricity to homes across Long Island, and how Covanta’s belief in responsible stewardship of the environment is essential for business efficiency and success.

The Fellows also had the opportunity to hear from several guest speakers, addressing issues from clean drinking water, to recycling on Long Island, to environmental resource management and energy conservation. Students heard from:

Stony Brook University students from the department of Environmental Design, Policy and Planning and their advisor, Donovan Finn, PhD. –Seven undergrad students presented their findings on a semester long recycling research project on “Waste Management: Best Practices and Lessons for Long Island.” The students worked to investigate ways to increase the viability of recycling programs on LI in order to better understand how to reduce the waste stream itself, collect best practices and success stories from other parts of the country, and report on data regarding existing municipal practices and codes applicable to residents on Long Island. The Fellows heard about several key waste management tactics such as: single stream recycling, alternative technologies (waste to energy facilities), standardized recycling waste and yard waste bins (green yard waste, blue recycling and black refuse bins), green business certification programs, business waste assessment, pay as you throw (PAYT) programs, as well as outreach and education programs.

Erin Reilley, Chief Sustainability Officer (Town of North Hempstead)

Discussed Long Island’s:

  • Water quality/quantity
  • Multi-use spaces to maximize land use
  • Septic systems
  • Brownfield contamination and cleanup
  • Energy efficiency and renewable energy (i.e. solar, wind)
  • Fishing and aquaculture
  • Habitat preservation
  • Environmental education programs in schools (i.e. composting, rain barrels, rain gardens)

Jordan Christensen (Citizens Campaign for the Environment)- an organization focused on helping citizens increase their influence and participation in environmental campaigns, accomplished through extensive research, education and public outreach. Jordan led an engaging PowerPoint presentation and discussion on some of the current environmental issues CCE is tackling, including water protection, public health, climate change and energy policy.

David Viana (Baldwin Civic Association) – an organization focused on encouraging public participation and awareness within the community and implementing neighborhood improvements and beautification projects. David discussed his role in helping the association preserve and maintain Baldwin’s parks and open spaces and how he partners with other organizations to achieve those objectives. David also shared some career advice and how he started his own nonprofit at such an early age.

In preparation for their work at the youth-staffed farmers’ markets, the Fellows attended training workshops in Nassau and Suffolk where they learned about numerous farms on Long Island and small business management, including customer service, promotion, marketing, safe food handling, cash handling, and the importance of proper nutrition. Each weekend in July, the Fellows worked with the youth staff at one of Sustainable Long Island’s partner farmers’ markets, under supervision of a Market Manager, to gain hands-on experience in all aspects of market operations, including stocking and setting up the market, operating the cash registers, and interacting with community members and customers. The Fellows’ work at the markets helped enhance their understanding of what it means to support local/regional farmers, and food equity issues, such as increasing access to fresh, affordable, healthy food.

High School Fellowship: Year Five

Group

The fifth year High School Fellows included:

  • Malachi Aarons, a senior at Wyandanch High School & LI High School for the Arts
  • Melchizedek Aarons, a junior at Wyandanch High School & LI High School for the Arts
  • Kimberly Henry, a senior at Roosevelt High School
  • Shanayia Lloyd, a junior at Wyandanch High School

Sustainable Long Island’s High School Fellowship Program concluded its fifth year of engaging other young adults in planning for the future. The focus of the fifth High School Fellowship was recycling, solar energy, green infrastructure and community agriculture, as well as additional sustainable development issues. Over the summer of 2014 – the last few months of the programs – fellows enjoyed a variety of field trips and guest speaker presentations that detailed a variety of sustainability topics.

The Fellows began their trip series with a visit to Level Solar, which provided a firsthand look into the solar power industry. The students traveled to the facility, located in Ronkonkoma, where they met with market analyst, Zack Grey, who gave a PowerPoint presentation on solar power and facilitated a discussion about the benefits of solar power versus the use of fossil fuels, coal, and natural gas and the resulting carbon emissions that contribute to climate change. He then led them on an hour-long tour of the facility and shared some career advice and spoke about his role and involvement at the company.

On another trip, the fellows then visited Covanta, Long Island’s largest Energy-from-Waste facility, which provides environmentally safe municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal. The students were led on a tour of the facility by Chief Engineer, Edward Sandkuhl, who described how the facility processes 2,505 tons of municipal solid waste per-day, how the power generated is then sold to the Public Service Electric and Gas Company (PSEG), providing electricity to homes across Long Island, and how Covanta’s belief in responsible stewardship of the environment is essential for business efficiency and success. Later that same day, the group traveled to the LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Platinum Certified ‘Yes We Can’ Community Center, where they met with director, April Brown Lake for a tour of the state-of-the-art, 60,000 square foot facility, which is among the most energy efficient buildings in New York State. The Center is built to the highest standards in sustainable construction, with a LEED certified Platinum rating and features roof-top solar panels, grade-level solar trees, gray water reuse systems, electric vehicle recharging stations and geothermal heating and cooling.

The Fellows’ field trip series then culminated in two guided site tours late last month. The first was to D’Addario & Company, Inc, one of the largest manufacturers of musical instrument strings in the world, headquartered in Farmingdale. The students were led on a two hour tour of the site with Tom Stack, a LEED certified architect who discussed the company’s emphasis on the three pillars of sustainability: economic development, social equity, and environmental health. The students were able to see how the spaces were designed with sustainability in mind: using recycled and recyclable products, incorporating glass walls which provide increased access to natural light, and ergonomically designed furniture.

The Fellows’ then traveled to Huntington Station and met with Frances Whittelsey, executive director of Long Island Community Agriculture Network (LICAN) for a tour of their Gateway Community Garden, where community members gather to grow their own organic food. Here, Frances explained how LI-CAN is dedicated to increasing public awareness and knowledge of the art and science of sustainable food and agriculture, and promotes community & global health, well-being and food security. As the Fellows’ began their work at our youth-staffed farmers’ markets just a few weeks prior, this trip helped build upon their knowledge of food equity, and improving access to healthy, fresh food options, including community gardens and farmers’ markets.

The Fellows also had the opportunity to hear from several guest speakers, addressing issues from clean drinking water, to commuter and mobility options on Long Island, to environmental resource management and energy conservation. Students heard from:

  • Joe Mecca, a Senior Consultant with Environmental Resource Management, which has been named the world’s leading sustainability consultancy and is the leading provider of environmental, health, safety and social consulting services across the globe who discussed his involvement in projects such as hydro-fracking, brownfields, energy conservation and more.
  • Katie Dunn with 511NY Rideshare, an organization that facilitates ride matching, commuter and traveler services for individuals who want to enhance their mobility options. The students discussed the benefits of such programs to commuters and the environment, their contribution to sustainability, and pledged to take part in Car Free Day in September of 2014, by using alternative modes of transportation such as public transit, carpooling, bicycles, and walking.
  • Megan Porter, a former Sustainable Long Island intern,  who is now a City Planner for the city of Long Beach, NY. Megan discussed her experiences as a student, an intern, the path to her current career, as well as the work going on in Long Beach, following Superstorm Sandy.
  • Jordan Christensen from Citizens Campaign for the Environment, an organization focused on helping citizens increase their influence and participation in environmental campaigns, accomplished through extensive research, education and public outreach. Jordan led an engaging PowerPoint presentation and discussion on some of the current environmental issues CCE is tackling, including water protection, public health, climate change and energy policy.

Overall, the 2014 program included:

Participating in Community Planning and Sustainability Orientation:

  • Learning about planning methods, roles of stakeholders through research, guest speakers, and field trips/conferences
  • Developing knowledge of local/regional environmental concerns, with a focus on water and environmental justice, along with tools for integrating sustainable development into planning
  • Participating in community group meetings
  • Participating in Long Island planning activities

Providing assistance at community youth-led farmers’ markets:

  • Outreach to youth, increasing awareness of food equity issues on Long Island
  • Participating in training to develop skills in small business management
  • Demonstrating knowledge of produce to community consumers, along with benefits of eating local, nutritious food and supporting regional farmers and the  local economy

Developing and further expanding the Mentorship Initiative:

  • Outreach to youth and local/regional high schools
  • Developing and distributing educational materials
  • Starting/continuing Long Island high school alliance to share information about sustainability, involving the schools the Fellows attend and other schools within the region

Conduct outreach for and facilitate youth component of community planning process:

  • Outreach to youth
  • Developing of educational materials
  • Reporting on findings

High School Fellowship: Year Four

For year four of the High School Fellowship, Sustainable Long Island hired four junior and senior high school students interested in issues of sustainability, community planning and development, and civic engagement to participate in planning processes, engage other young adults in planning for the future, and learning about local and regional food systems. The Fellowship is an opportunity to learn about and participate in community based planning and regional efforts to ensure a sustainable Long Island for generations to come.

Sustainable LI’s Fellowship Class of 2012-2013:

  •  Glen Farquharson, Jr
  • Kayla Bomani
  • Quanah Bennett
  • Lauren Birck

HS Fellowship Recap (Year 1-3):

Participation of youth is essential to the future of planning. Through Sustainable Long Island’s High School Fellowship Program, participants will have the opportunity to learn and participate in community based planning and engage other youth from across the region. These young adults are smart, creative and hard working. They have taken ownership of the fellowship and completed their work with excellence and professionalism.

Sustainable LI’s Fellowship Class of 2011-2012:

  • Ashif Hassan
  • Holly Josephs
  • Stephanie Mejia
  • Makese Powe
  • Emily Wilkins

Highlights from the Third Annual Fellowship’s program included:

  • Researching and working on local and regional water issues, while  learning about conservation measures to help protect this vital resource.
  • Facilitating an interactive youth visioning workshop for our closed auto dealership project at the Boys and Girls Club of the Greater Bellport Area. The Fellows recorded participants’ comments, helped to identify themes, and worked with their peers to rethink the future of their community.
  • Launching a Community Engagement Page on Facebook, where they continue to develop ways to raise awareness of planning among their peers and community

Sustainable Long Island’s Fellowship Class of 2010-2011

  • Sarah DeGray
  • Ibeth Escobar
  • Matthew Lippertshauser
  • Sean Mohan
  • Monica Velasquez
  • Brian Yakkey

Sustainable Long Island 2nd Annual High School Fellowship employed numerous high school juniors and seniors across Long Island  to work closely with staff on community planning and revitalization projects within the organization.

Funded by the Levitt Foundation, this program engages students in a local community planning project, develop creative, fun outreach methods targeted at young adults, and learn about local and regional food systems while helping with Sustainable Long Island’s youth-run farmers’ markets.

“This fellowship gives the chance for students to see what it’s like to work at a nonprofit organization, complete day-to-day tasks, while focusing on numerous projects and planning processes” said Sarah Lansdale, Executive Director, Sustainable Long Island. “Students will be active in and learning about issues of sustainability, community planning, and development and civic engagement.”

Students including Sarah DeGray of Sachem High School North, Ibeth Escobar of Roosevelt High School, Matthew Lippertshauser of Bethpage High School, and Monica Velasquez of Uniondale High School receive a stipend for their work, which entails a one year part-time commitment including 20 hours a week in the summer and five hours a week during the school year. This program helped students build different skills, while providing experience to those who will soon be off to college looking for more part time, and eventually, full time jobs.

“It’s important to me to get younger people involved in issues that our communities face on a daily basis,” said Matthew Lippertshauser. “I hope to learn from this experience and educate others along the way.”

Sustainable Long Island’s Fellowship Class of 2009-2010

  • Rachel Kaufman
  • Adam Roberts
  • Colby Sim

The inaugural year of our High School Fellowship was a tremendous success. Some highlights for the students included the opportunity to attend and present at the Long Island Regional Planning Council and meet with several regional leaders including Kirk Kordeleski, President and CEO of Bethpage Federal Credit Union.

Additionally, they attended a week-long Environmental Citizenship Institute at CW Post. Other experiences have included presenting at a Sustainable Long Island Board of Director’s Meeting, attending press conferences with local government officials and meeting Former Nassau County Executive Tom Suozzi and NYS Governor Paterson at a local Long Island event. From these experiences, the students learned first-hand how government operates informing them of how to be advocates for environmental change.

The students assisted in outreach for Freeport community process and developed draft outreach materials for the general community and for youth, while also participating in physically placing the materials in the community.

Contact Arielle Miller at 516-873-0230 x107 for more information on future fellowship opportunities!